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TOPIC: Education Quotes

Quotes:


"If a nation expects to be ignorant and free, in a state of civilization, it expects what never was and never will be. The functionaries of every government have propensities to command at will the liberty and property of their constituents. There is no safe deposit for these but with the people themselves; nor can they be safe with them without information. Where the press is free, and every man able to read, all is safe."

Source: A letter written to Colonel Charles Yancey, January 6, 1816 at Jefferson's Monticello estate, Albemarle County, near Charlottesville, Virginia, USA
Author: Jefferson, Thomas
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"It is perfectly well understood at the south, that to educate a slave is to make him discontented with slavery, and to invest him with a power which shall open to him the treasures of freedom; and since the object of the slaveholder is to maintain complete authority over his slave, his constant vigilance is exercised to prevent everything which militates against, or endangers, the stability of his authority. Education being among the menacing influences, and, perhaps, the most dangerous, is, therefore, the most cautiously guarded against."

Source: Lecture on slavery delivered in Corinthian Hall, Rochester, NY on Sunday evening, December 1st, 1850
Author: Douglass, Frederick
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"This is shown by the fact that in every state of the American Union, where slavery exists, except the State of Kentucky, there are laws absolutely prohibitory of education among the slaves. The crime of teaching a slave to read is punishable with severe fines and imprisonment, and, in some instances, with death itself."

Source: Lecture on slavery delivered in Corinthian Hall, Rochester, NY on Sunday evening, December 1st, 1850
Author: Douglass, Frederick
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"We must never let the weight of this combination endanger our liberties or democratic processes. We should take nothing for granted. Only an alert and knowledgeable citizenry can compel the proper meshing of the huge industrial and military machinery of defense with our peaceful methods and goals, so that security and liberty may prosper together."

Source: Farewell radio and television address to the American people, January 17, 1961 (Delivered from the president's office at 8:30 p.m)
Author: Eisenhower, Dwight D.
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"Everything has its limit--iron ore cannot be educated into gold."

Source: Twain, M. (1910). What is Man? New York and London: Harper and Brothers 1917.
Author: Twain, Mark
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"Whereas it appeareth that however certain forms of government are better calculated than others to protect individuals in the free exercise of their natural rights, and are at the same time themselves better guarded against degeneracy, yet experience hath shewn, that even under the best forms, those entrusted with power have, in time, and by slow operations, perverted it into tyranny; and it is believed that the most effectual means of preventing this would be, to illuminate, as far as practicable, the minds of the people at large, and more especially to give them knowledge of those facts, which history exhibiteth, that, possessed thereby of the experience of other ages and countries, they may be enabled to know ambition under all its shapes, and prompt to exert their natural powers to defeat its purposes..."

Source: An excerpt from the preamble of a Virginia bill written by Thomas Jefferson in 1779 known as 'A Bill for the More General Diffusion of Knowledge'
Author: Jefferson, Thomas
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"Above all things I hope the education of the common people will be attended to, convinced that on their good sense we may rely with the most security for the preservation of a due degree of liberty."

Source: A letter written to James Madison, December 20, 1787
Author: Jefferson, Thomas
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"I think by far the most important bill in our whole code is that for the diffusion of knowledge among the people. No other sure foundation can be devised, for the preservation of freedom and happiness. If any body thinks, that kings, nobles, or priests are good conservators of the public happiness, send him here. It is the best school in the universe to cure him of that folly. He will see here, with his own eyes, that these descriptions of men are an abandoned confederacy against the happiness of the mass of the people. The omnipotence of their effect cannot be better proved, than in this country particularly, where, notwithstanding the finest soil upon earth, the finest climate under heaven, and a people of the most benevolent, the most gay and amiable character of which the human form is susceptible; where such a people, I say, surrounded by so many blessings from nature, are loaded with misery by kings, nobles, and priests, and by them alone. Preach, my dear Sir, a crusade against ignorance; establish and improve the law for educating the common people. Let our countrymen know that the people alone can protect us against these evils, and that the tax which will be paid for this purpose is not more than the thousandth part of what will be paid to kings, priests and nobles who will rise up among us if we leave the people in ignorance."

Source: A letter written from Paris to George Wythe (Jefferson's former professor) August 13, 1786
Author: Jefferson, Thomas
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